Posts Tagged ‘depression’

What is Havening Technique?

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

 

Havening Technique™ was created by Dr Ronald Ruden and further developed in conjunction with his brother Dr Steven Ruden. It is a psycho-sensory model and uses sensory input of touch (Havening Touch®) to alter thought, mood and behaviour.

 

Traumatic or very stressful events or experiences create a pathway in the brain which remains there indefinitely (becomes immutably encoded), until or unless people embark on a process to change, obstruct or disrupt that pathway to bring about new enriching experiences.

 

Havening Technique™ works by reducing or eliminating altogether the negative maladaptive emotional response linked to that event or experience. In doing so, Havening works with the Amygdala, the emotional response system in the brain, which is based in the Limbic System. As such Havening is also referred to as Amygdala Depotentiation Therapy (ADT). Havening disrupts the pathway that was created and consequently removes the emotional PAIN linked to and/or associated with the stress, distress and experiences (current and past), resulting in neutral or no negative emotional response to the situation.

anxiety

Havening Technique is a very effective approach for a range of emotionally distressful situations and symptoms with profound and long lasting results.

 

This includes situations and symptoms relating to:

  • Relationship challenges
  • Domestic violence
  • Bullying
  • Fear of heights
  • Emotional eating
  • Depression
  • Agoraphobia and other Phobias
  • Fear of Abandonment
  • Sexual abuse
  • Lack of confidence
  • Feelings of low self worth
  • Anxiety
  • Self harm
  • Loneliness
  • PTSD
  • Physical pain
  • Post Natal Depression

 

In order for Havening to be most effective for the client, the emotional core symptom that activates their emotional response system; and, which poses the biggest  challenge and disturbance to the client, must be identified, Havened and consequently removed. This is the fundamental difference between Talk Therapy and Havening Technique™.

 

During the Havening Therapy, clients generally experience an increase in certain neurochemicals such as Serotonin and GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), and a low frequency brain signal, a delta wave, which is generally associated with stage three sleep. Stage three sleep is the deepest and most restorative part of our sleep. A successful Havening experience can leave clients feeling a sense of calmness, relaxation, peacefulness or sleepy.

 

The effect and result of experiencing the Havening model includes results such as, once a particular negative emotional response has been eliminated (e.g. guilt, shame), it can have the effect of directly or indirectly and simultaneously removing other related negative maladaptive emotions linked to the same or different negative experiences or trauma. Another effect could be that the removal of one traumatic event reveals another one, which is also subsequently Havened with the client’s permission.

 

Photo from: mamamia.com.au

Photo from: mamamia.com.au

In relation to recall and emotional attachment to the distressing or traumatic event or experience, clients often experience and report a sense of disbelief in the results, which could include one or several of the following:

 

  • Inability to recall the previous distressing or traumatic event
  • Their recollection of the distressing experience is fuzzy
  • They can recall the experience and event however they now have a neutral emotional attachment to it
  • Thinking or talking about the distressing experience no longer triggers their emotional response system or their usual negative emotional responses to the experience.
  • A range of emotional, physical or physiological changes can occur. For instance, clients can appear to grow in height instantly; or have the ability to move parts of their body which were emotionally, psychologically or physically affected by the traumatic experience; or have restful sleep throughout the night, which hitherto had been affected resulting from their previous experience(s).

 

The Havening model engenders a healthier outlook on life, healthier choices and most importantly, mental and emotional resilience (a resilient landscape).

 

Havening approach can also be used for peak performance, goals achievement, or Self Havening of every day routine emotions such as sadness, anger or mild anxiety. Self Havening is not recommended for serious trauma or psychological disorders. It is highly recommended that you seek assistance from a Certified Havening Technique™ Practitioner.

The Economic Crisis VS the Increase in Self Harm

Wednesday, May 29th, 2013

In a recent publication by Robert Young, (Royal College of Psychiatrists) Young states: ‘Self-harm among young people in the UK is possibly increasing but little is known about the reasons young people give for cessation and their link with gender or employment status’.

For many people self harm and self injure may be seen as a form of relief. However, what many people fail to question and have little self harm awareness about is why they indulge in such activities in the first instance. Young people undertake self harm activities in all different methods, including; cutting, biting, hair pulling, scratching and intoxicating themselves with cocktails of drugs. Hurting themselves may seem like an only option to release stress from feelings such as; sadness, self-loathing, emptiness, guilt, and rage. It is apparent that gender, social status and generally the current economic crisis are all contribution factors of the increase in young people who self harm. For example; the pressure in society to get a good education, followed by a good job is proving to be difficult as the unemployment graduate market is on the rise. Many young people may feel pressurized and stressed and as a result may turn to self harm.

Young’s research suggests that the main motive behind most young people’s self-harm activities was to relieve negative emotions. From the population based studies; there is an indication that the majority of young people who self harm may have limited coping strategies in dealing with emotional difficulties.

Keith Waters who is a member of the National Institute for health research NHS Derby, and who was one of our key leading speakers at our Self Harm National Conference December 2012, highlighted problems which occurred on a current data base for young people who were assessed in all episodes of self harm and attended one in six hospitals within the UK. These problems were identified as relationships, employment, study, financial, housing, legal,substance misuse and physical and mental health.

Gender is also a topic for discussion as research also suggests the percentage of young women who self harm has a higher prevalence than young males and that it is an important predictor of self harm. People often self harm because they feel alone. Others finding ways to help and support young individuals can be life changing for them. Just to know that someone is available offering relevant support and help for self harm and to listen to their problems can be very comforting.

Additionally, Young’s findings suggests that there is also an indication that the current labour market position was a stronger influence than parental social class or gender for self harm, and was linked to a level of severity, motivation for starting and stopping self harm and self injury, and for service utilisation. That said, it is vital that young people have relevant and real self harm help support available to them to prevent or decrease cases of self harm.

Children With School Refusal Behaviour

Thursday, April 11th, 2013

School refusal stems from emotional distress and anxiety which could be related to a range of issues either at home, school or both. A recent study reveals that 1 in 5 British children experience phobia or school refusal which has shown to be more prevalent in children’s age groups aged 5 – 6 and 10 – 11 years.

The research also revealed that many parents were not aware of the conditions and those who were aware of it, experienced a major lack of information.

School refusal does and can bring about a range of physical challenges and symptoms for the child or young person and these include:

– stomach aches

– vomiting

– headaches

– trembling

– joint pains

From a behavioural perspective, the symptoms show up as: tantrums, threats of self harm, crying or angry outbursts. These symptoms are likely to subside once the child feels safe and secure, generally in the home environment and/or once they’ve been allowed to stay at home.

School refusal may be triggered by a number of reasons, children of any age may be refusing to go to school for fear of losing their last remaining parent (or main care giver). Their parents may have separated or they might be a bereaved child and the fear of even more loss, keeps them at home and in a ‘protective role’ and with separation anxiety.

As well as anxiety, other stress related situations at home, school or with peers may also be a trigger for school refusal.

From an emotional perspective, symptoms of school refusal include panic attacks, fearfulness, depression and occurs with both genders.

One of my sons had a change of primary schools and the new primary school that he moved to was a trigger for his school refusal right from the first day of school.

He was evidently emotionally distressed by going to that school, was crying and wouldn’t get dressed in the mornings. He said that the school was too big, which I didn’t understand but his deep reaction and distress to attending that school was more than enough for me to take heed. Within a week he had moved yet again to another primary school and was evidently happier, brighter with smiles all round, which brought about the swift end to his short-lived school refusal.

School refusal and a range of other behaviours from children and young people is merely a form of communication that something is not right. This calls for school staff and parents to look more closely at what is not being said. What is their behaviour telling you?

There is always a reason for children’s behaviour and it is invaluable piece of communication for adults.

How Can You Help Children With School Refusal Behaviour?

Doctors, Parents, Educators, and other professionals can all assist in supporting a child or young person back to school, individually or as a team.

Some ways of helping include:

 

  1. Identify whether the behaviour relates to school refusal for reasons such as those above or whether it relates to truancy. The distinction between the two generally lies on the child’s focus and/or interest in their school work once their anxiety or fear of school attendance and other related symptoms have subsided. That is, how do they behave once they feel safe and secure at home? Do they focus on their school work or is there a total dis-interest and general negative attitude towards school? Another distinction is the extent of their emotional distress relating to attending school versus being indifferent about school attendance.
  2. Explore best possible options of moving the child towards re-entering the school environment as quickly as possible, yet in a supportive manner. This could include making changes, where possible, to conditions at home which might be triggering the school refusal and engendering collaborative approach between parents, doctor, school and mental health professional/therapist. As some of the presenting symptoms are physical, it is important to involve physicians who may also be able to make referrals to relevant therapists.
  3. Research has shown cognitive behaviour therapy to be particularly beneficial and successful in helping pupils to manage their mindsets, depression and returning to school.
  4. Parental involvement to improve school attendance has also shown to be helpful.
  5. Undertake proper preparation at school for the pupil to be re-integrated and positively supported back into the normal school environment
  6. Foster on-going parent-school communication, collaboration and joint support of the child.
  7. Planned, gradual, assisted exposure to the school environment
  8. Relaxation remedies including visualisation.
  9. Positive reinforcements relating to school environment and attendance.

 

Do you have pupils who refuse to attend school?

Which of the above strategies would work for them?

Which strategies have you yet to try or test out?

Send us your examples of school refusal and how you dealt with it to: info@stepup-international.co.uk
Find out how our courses can assist you in getting a better understanding of children and young people’s behaviour here: http://stepup-international.co.uk/self-harm-training-2/